Motor Accident Insurance Commission

By: CompensationLawFirms.com.au March 29, 2014 Comments
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Motor Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC)

The Motor Accidents Insurance Commission (MAIC) is an Australian statutory corporation that regulates the compulsory third party (CTP) scheme used in the Australian state of Queensland.

What is the Queensland CTP Scheme?

The Queensland CTP scheme is a compulsory, fault-based scheme that provides people injured in vehicle accidents an insurance policy. This policy itself provides unlimited liability coverage for all personal injuries caused by a motor vehicle. This scheme is based on the Motor Accident Insurance Act of 1994.

The key thing that differentiates the Queensland CTP scheme from the CTP schemes of many other states and territories is that it takes into consideration fault. This means that injured parties must be able to proof that someone else (the person driving the car, the other driver, etc.) caused the accident due to some form of negligence.

If the injured party can prove liability, the injured party can then ask a law court for monetary compensation. However, issues can arise when there is no negligent party against whom a claim can be made, such as if the accused dies during the incident. There is an additional Nominal Defendant sub-scheme that deals with this contingency.

What Does the MAIC Do?

As a regulatory body, the MAIC regulates and manages the Queensland CTP scheme. Its primary duty is to approve private licensed insurance companies. These companies then take on the task of accepting applications, underwriting insurance policies and managing claims. The funds for victim compensation come solely from the insurer’s premium pool.

A list of all the activities conducted by the MAIC is included below:

  • It licenses and supervises all Queensland CTP insurers.
  • It monitors the overall operation of the Queensland CTP scheme.
  • It conducts research in rehabilitative medical sciences.
  • It promotes the rehabilitation of injured parties.
  • It tracks all vehicle accident statistics.
  • It handles the Nominal Defendant Fund.

What Is The Nominal Defendant Fund?

The Nominal Defendant Fund is managed by the MAIC and used to provide compensation in rare cases where, for instance, the liable party has no insurance. This compensation is funded by one of four levies imposed on all CTP insurance premiums:

  • Nominal Defendant Levy: This levy helps provide compensation for those cases where the liable party is either unidentified or uninsured.
  • Statutory Insurance Scheme Levy: This levy helps fund the MAIC itself so that it can keep on board the staff members needed to regulate the CTP scheme.
  • Hospital And Emergency Services Levy: This levy helps fund the cost of public and emergency medical services provided to injured parties.
  • Administration Fee: This fee or levy helps fund the process of collecting and administering CTP insurance premiums.

Useful MAIC Tools

The Motor Accident Insurance Commission website features several very useful tools and pages:

CTP Premium Calculator
The CTP Premium Calculator is an easy-to-use-tool that provides a potential CTP premium quote based on the information submitted into a form. The types of info required include the vehicle class and period of coverage. Note that for a more exact value, it is best to speak directly with a Queensland CTP insurer.

Claims Overview
This page provides an overview of the Queensland CTP claims process via an easy-to-follow flowchart. It is ideal for getting a general idea of what to do next.

Claim Forms Database
This useful page contains forms for claimants, legal practitioners and medical practioners.

List Of Licensed Insurers
This page contains a list of all currently licensed insurers who are allowed to practice in Queensland. It includes AAI Limited, Allianz Australia Insurance Limited, QBE Insurance Limited and RACQ Insurance Limited. It is best for Queensland residents to only go through these entities. This reduces the risk of falling prey to a scam.

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